Sag Harbor Antique Fire Truck Museum Goes Back to the Boards

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A rendering of the proposed Sag Harbor Antique Fire Truck Museum at 426 and 432 Main Street on Ligonee Brook. Courtesy Sag Harbor Antique Fire Trucks Inc.
A rendering of the proposed Sag Harbor Antique Fire Truck Museum at 426 and 432 Main Street on Ligonee Brook. Courtesy Sag Harbor Antique Fire Trucks Inc.

By Christine Sampson

The Sag Harbor Antique Fire Truck Museum is going back to its original plan of building a new facility on the property it owns on Main Street after receiving word that the Brick Kiln Road property it hoped to buy and develop instead had been taken off the market.

“It was disappointing,” Ed Deyermond, a former Sag Harbor Village trustee who is vice president of the museum, said last Thursday. “We were really looking forward to having something directly across the street from the Brick Kiln Road firehouse. It would have been perfect, but the situation has changed and we’re trying to adapt.”

An obstacle has arisen in the building process: While the museum owns three adjacent parcels of land, all of which were included in the original site plan for the new facility, only two of them are actually within village limits. The third is in Southampton Town, and Mr. Deyermond said it was included on the site plan in error.

“It was never our intention to build on that piece,” he said. “It was our intention to sell that to [Southampton] Town for preservation.”

Attorney Dennis Downes, who represents the Sag Harbor Antique Fire Truck Museum, told the village’s Planning Board on December 26 that the museum is now in the process of going back to the regulatory boards to amend its approvals so that the Southampton Town parcel can be split off from the original site plan, clearing the way for a potential sale.

Another challenge that has popped up is the museum’s building project now requires a variance from the Sag Harbor Zoning Board of Appeals because the lot is too small for the proposed building.

The Sag Harbor Antique Fire Truck Museum is planned as a three-bay, 1,200-square-foot building to store and work on vehicles that are used for parades, funerals and other events. It already received one variance from the ZBA for a pyramid law violation of 1,340 cubic feet, granted in August of 2016.

“We’re attempting to rectify that situation,” Mr. Deyermond said, “and we hope that we’re successful.”

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