New Website Launched To Help Homeowners Navigate Septic Replacement Options

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Suffolk County and the Group for the East End have partnered in a new effort to boost participation in the septic replacement incentive programs offered by the county and East End towns

Suffolk County and the Group for the East End have partnered in a new effort to boost participation in the septic replacement incentive programs offered by the county and East End towns.

The Group and the county have launched a new website, cleanwatercash.org, that offers detailed information about the low-nitrogen septic systems the county allows to be installed and the programs through which residents can have most or all of the costs covered through grant funding.

The site contains a link to a full list of quotes of purchase and installation costs for all the advanced treatment systems now available from several installers in the area. The prices range from about $14,000 to more than $25,000, not including landscaping and other site work that would be required to restore a property after the installation.

Suffolk County offers grants of up to $30,000, and both Southampton and East Hampton towns are offering $20,000 in rebate or grant funding to homeowners who want to replace their aging septic systems with one of the six nitrogen-reducing systems that Suffolk County has now approved for use.

“Fortunately, the technology is now available to greatly improve our wastewater treatment, and residents can take advantage of a growing number of financial incentives that significantly reduce the cost of getting advanced treatment systems installed,” said Group for the East End president Bob DeLuca. “We developed the ‘Clean Water Cash’ website as a tool to help every resident easily understand the water quality issues facing our region, and find out what incentives they can qualify for if they want to install an advanced treatment system on their property.”

Nitrogen from human waste leaching into groundwater from crumbling cesspools and ineffective septic systems has been blamed by marine scientists for the chronic algae blooms that have plagued Long Island waters over the last 30 years, and the state, county and towns have pledged tens of millions to reducing the nitrogen influx.

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