A Comprehensive, Often Magical, Approach to Spiritual Self Care in Sag Harbor

0
2570
Juli Everett, a lifelong resident of Sag Harbor, is the owner of Knead and Seed in Sag Harbor. Christine Sampson photo

Juli Everett’s house in Sag Harbor has all the makings of a magical space.

A guest enters through a door that wards off evil spirits with an eye amulet in the doorknob; one’s first impression is it’s one part library, one part living room. When tea is offered, it may very well be one cute little part café, too. A low sofa in one corner, piled with pillows, sits caddy-corner to a window, whose curtains are either thrust open to let in natural light or closed for a softer, darker ambiance. An intricate wicker chair, sometimes decorated as a throne for special events, is a centerpiece in the living room. Upstairs is an herbal apothecary. It all smells just so good.

This is where Everett operates her business, Knead and Seed, which she describes as “a wellness center that focuses on aligning your mind, body and spirit through multiple modalities.” A modality is another term for method or technique; examples of modalities, in the case of Knead and Seed, include massage therapy, herbalism, reiki, aura photography, astrology and what Everett calls “elevation” or spiritual education. She also makes house calls for massage therapy.

She opened the business in July of 2017 and it has grown quickly, she says, through word of mouth and social media outreach. She started first with massage therapy before branching out with her other talents and abilities.

“I’ve been fortunate with the growth in such a short amount of time,” Everett said. “It’s all felt really organic and natural in a no-pressure situation.”

One of her most popular offerings is her Women’s Goddess Circles, held at the full moon and new moon each month. Twelve women take part each time, sharing stories, chanting mantras, exercising their minds and bodies, dancing, motivating each other and honoring a different goddess each time.

“It has really been empowering to be able to sit in a room with 12 other women, hear their stories and have them be so supportive of each other, which I think a lot of women out here don’t feel like they have,” Everett said.

Everett, a 2004 graduate of Pierson High School, traces her interest in astrology back to being 13 years old and hanging out at Metaphysical Books and Tools on Main Street, which closed in 2005. But she says the proclivity toward astrology has run in her family for several generations.

As an herbalist, she makes custom tea blends for people, as well as potions, spells and rituals.

“There’s no real access to these magical things, and they’re very powerful,” Everett said. “I only do positive, and I don’t believe in any kind of bad magic or energy. I don’t believe in doing harm to others.”

She likens herbalism to “making your own medicine,” but she is careful to note that it’s not intended to treat, cure or diagnose actual diseases or illnesses. “If I am concerned about something, I always err on the side of caution and recommend talking to a doctor,” she said.

When she does massage therapy, she offers Swedish massage, Asian-style massages and adds crystals and aromatherapy if her clients desire them. When she does astrological readings for people, she says it’s her goal to make it “tangible” for people. “It’s like learning a foreign language,” said Everett, who also writes personal horoscopes for clients.

While Everett does have some clients who are men, Knead and Seed does draw more women as clients. She says she is lucky enough to have a flexible schedule, allowing her to maximize her own personal time and family time with her husband, Tom, and her six-year-old son, Jackson.

Her future goals include working with younger women and girls, offering workshops on crystals and crown-making. She is also offering a retreat, the “Venus Rising” in North Carolina in June, along with Kitty Cavalier, a noted expert in expert in embodied living and feminine sensuality.

“Knead and Seed is more than I ever could have imagined,” Everett said. “Most people come in here and tell me they feel safe and calm. That feels really good.”

Visit Knead and Seed online at kneadandseed.com, follow @kneadandseed on Instagram or call (631) 926-0063 to learn more about the business.

Comments