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Editorial: Show Must Go On

The fluid nature of the state’s response to the COVID-19 epidemic and, in particular, to school districts being allowed to host graduation ceremonies for departing seniors has left many district officials reeling this week, as they try to determine whether they can change course quickly to plan some kind of event for later in the month.

Letters to the Editor: June 11, 2020

Letters to the Editor for the week of June 11, 2020

Editorial: A Shout In The Street

Our health and economy are both a mess, with only shaky steps forward out of the darkness. The nation’s spirit was already volatile, and it needed only a tiny spark to set it off. Instead, there was an inferno.

Letters to the Editor: June 4, 2020

Letters to the Editor for the week of June 4, 2020

Letters to the Editor: May 28, 2020

Letters to the Editor for the week of May 28, 2020.

Letter From Home: Tapsalteerie

Self-quarantining is not a new practice for some of us. I have been in training most of my adult life. I am a writer. With agoraphobic tendencies.

Editorial: Second-Guessing Steinbeck Park

“Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen,” said celebrated author John Steinbeck — and it appears that the committee advising Sag Harbor Village on the future of its newest waterfront park have more than a few ideas in mind regarding the name of that space. 

Prickles, Thorns and Spines, Oh My

I don’t know why I became obsessed over clarifying the difference between things on a plant that will draw blood, but it’s a rabbit hole I fell down that I thought I’d share with you. Perhaps it’s because the word prickle makes me smile, but I thought I’d clarify the terms for us.

“Locally Sourced” at the Heckscher

The Heckscher’s wide-ranging collection includes European and American art spanning three centuries. To celebrate its centenary, the museum is focusing on works by regional artists, from Edward Moran’s atmospheric 1872 study of fog-bound sailboats in New York Bay (one of Heckscher’s original donations) to a pair of mixed-media works on paper from Bastienne Schmidt’s Underwater Topography series, completed last year. Comprising more than 100 works, “Locally Sourced: Collecting Long Island Artists,” on view through March 15, illustrates the diversity of the region’s creative community, with something to please everyone’s taste, including the children’s.

Editorial: Who We Are

The Reverend Karen Campbell of Christ Episcopal Church in Sag Harbor is the latest East End resident to return from the southern border with eyewitness testimony of what’s happening there, despite the politically charged rhetoric that has made conversations about immigration so difficult. But they are necessary conversations — and perhaps they are most effective when led by ministers, who can remind everyone of the moral imperatives that often get overshadowed. 

Letters to the Editor: February 27, 2020

Fond Memories I really enjoyed Jim Marquardt’s article on the Watchcase factory saving Sag Harbor . The history of Fahys and Bulova were very informative....

Editorial: An American Success Story

As Black History Month comes to a close, February delivered a devastating blow with the death of B. Smith, whose pioneering role as an African American entrepreneur cannot be overstated. 

Home: Never Wanting to Leave Sag Harbor

I often wonder why it is that I’m forever teeter-tottering between wanting to travel the world and never wanting to leave home? My husband, man of few words, reminds me that it is because our ‘home’, Sag Harbor, is one of the most beautiful places in the world. One minute I’m at the top-ready to fly off to foreign lands; while the next minute, I don’t want to budge from under my electric throw blanket. However, after speaking with the Schiavonis, I realize I’m not the only one that feels that way.

Looking Back: Puritans On Long Island

By Jim Marquardt The Duke of York wrote to Governor Andrus, a colonial administrator in New Amsterdam, on April 8, 1675, “I shall let you...

Notes From the Field: Cutting Stems In the Winter

It’s that time of year, when the air starts to taste different, when you can see the far side of winter and off in the distance — yes for sure, that’s definitely spring. Still, don’t be fooled into letting down your guard, we could possibly still have a lot of cold to get through but on sunny days. I too want to go out there and do some gardening, and yes, I too am sick of weeding (although I did get a nifty new longer handled Japanese weeding hoe that I’m very excited about. I still can’t kneel or squat down without pain in my new knee). So, what to do?

Latest Articles

The Express News Group Presents 27Speaks, A Weekly Podcast: September 17 Edition

In this week’s edition of 27Speaks, the editors are joined by Sag Harbor Express Publisher Emeritus Bryan Boyhan to discuss an article he wrote on the 50th anniversary of the tragic flight of The Free Life, a hot air balloon that was launched from Springs in an unsuccessful attempt to cross the Atlantic Ocean.

Remembering The Free Life 50 Years Later

They would float up the coast to Maine. There, they would catch the westerlies that would blow them the 2,500 miles to Europe. Up there, in the beauty and the silence, you hear the true noise of the sea coming up at you. There was plenty of food on board, stocked with salamis and cheeses — fatty food to keep them warm and filled — water, Champagne for celebrating, of course, plus some emergency supplies. But it turns out the crew of The Free Life, a seven-story high Roziére balloon that lifted off from a field in Springs 50 years ago this week, would not need it.

A Father Shares Advice: In his Book, Richie Jackson offers a Road Map...

At the age of 15, when Jackson Foo Wong came out and told his parents that he was gay, his father, Richie Jackson, a TV and theater producer based in New York City, couldn’t have been more delighted. That’s because for Jackson, being gay had long been an important defining feature of his own life.