Columns

Is There A There, There?

“Why are you going THERE?” everyone wants to know”…especially why are you going there for Thanksgiving.”

Viewpoint: Tales from Traffic Court

By Bruce Buschel Judge: Mr. Buschel, you are allowed, though not required, to be accompanied by an attorney and witnesses. Your honor, I have no attorney...

Home: Kathi McCarron — ‘Found and Found’

This year Sag Harbor’s Kathi McCarron will celebrate having a family that she never knew she had. Ancestry DNA and her “search angel,” Marsha, have opened a new and exciting door into Ms. McCarron’s life.

On The Road: The Politics of Holidays

Well, the holidays are officially upon us — or I should say they’re officially upon the inside of my car. At least, that’s what Sirius XM Radio has been telling me since adding Channel 70 to its roster back on November 1.

For The Other Kind Of Leftovers

Like many cooks, I often make too much food for Thanksgiving, which I then pack up and give to my guests, because I’ve been...

Michael A. Butler: “Preserving The History of Home”

As an artist, historian, humanitarian, Michael A. Butler continues to leave his mark on Sag Harbor, stroke by stroke, step by step.

Point of View: Long-Term Planning for Sag Harbor Village

Thank you to all who attended the trial run of a Saturday Village Board of Trustees work session on October 26.  For anyone who could not attend I have written out my notes about of long-term goals for the village.

Eye on Art: Women of the 9th St. Show

In the November 24, 1975 issue of New York magazine, the art critic Thomas B. Hess reviewed an exhibition of portraits by Elaine de Kooning. Hess, who was himself among her subjects, described her as “one of the sparkling ‘Amazons’ who emerged in the flowering of American painting after World War II and into the 1950’s.” He also mentioned several female artists of the early 20th century Russian avant-garde to whom that “equivocal nickname” had been applied.

On the Road: Watching the Nest Grow Emptier

Here at our humble abode in the woods of Northwest, we’ve officially entered a new phase of empty nestdom. Which is probably why my new modus operandi is to alight in it as little as I can ... in other words, I am officially out and about.

Eye on Art: Looking Into Glass Houses

A few weeks ago, literally at the crack of dawn, an intrepid group assembled at LongHouse Reserve for an excursion to the Glass House and Grace Farms in New Canaan, Connecticut. Both sites are notable for their transparent architecture, but the concept behind each is very different.

On The Road: Storm Surge and the Bagels Left Behind

“Hi Mom … We’re evacuating.” It wasn’t exactly the phone call I was expecting just two weeks into my daughter’s first semester of college, but here it was.

Robert Browngardt: “At Home in the Crow’s Nest”

A collection of squirrel figurines adorned the windowsill of the “Crow’s Nest” — the screened in porch of the Browngardt house on Palmer Terrace. “My family has lived in this house since 1926,” Robert Browngardt explained. “I spend most of my time out here on the porch.”

Eye on Art: Montauk Highway III

For its third annual celebration of the artists who migrated to the South Fork in the years after World War II, the Eric Firestone...

On The Road: The Long Goodbye, Dorm Room Antics and The Art of Letting...

Frankly, it was not at all how I expected it to go. There we were, my husband Adam and I standing on the cobblestone walkway...

Point of View: With E-Cigarettes on the Rise, Do Students Know What They Are...

Teen use of e-cigarettes and vaping devices reached “epidemic” proportions last year, with 1 in 4 high school students say they are using, yet national surveys show that teens are largely unaware of what they’re really inhaling.

Latest Articles

The Express News Group Presents 27Speaks, A Weekly Podcast: September 17 Edition

In this week’s edition of 27Speaks, the editors are joined by Sag Harbor Express Publisher Emeritus Bryan Boyhan to discuss an article he wrote on the 50th anniversary of the tragic flight of The Free Life, a hot air balloon that was launched from Springs in an unsuccessful attempt to cross the Atlantic Ocean.

Remembering The Free Life 50 Years Later

They would float up the coast to Maine. There, they would catch the westerlies that would blow them the 2,500 miles to Europe. Up there, in the beauty and the silence, you hear the true noise of the sea coming up at you. There was plenty of food on board, stocked with salamis and cheeses — fatty food to keep them warm and filled — water, Champagne for celebrating, of course, plus some emergency supplies. But it turns out the crew of The Free Life, a seven-story high Roziére balloon that lifted off from a field in Springs 50 years ago this week, would not need it.

A Father Shares Advice: In his Book, Richie Jackson offers a Road Map...

At the age of 15, when Jackson Foo Wong came out and told his parents that he was gay, his father, Richie Jackson, a TV and theater producer based in New York City, couldn’t have been more delighted. That’s because for Jackson, being gay had long been an important defining feature of his own life.