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Climate Corner: Get Your Next Car in Green

My 2010 Toyota Corolla is what people politely call a beach car, and impolitely call a piece of … well … they’re just being honest. The exterior is covered in nicks and scrapes. Inside, it looks like I’m always on my way to the dump. It’s the sort of car that you never have to lock, because if someone is desperate enough to steal it, be my guest.

Climate Corner: A Q&A with a Higher Authority

Most people know God for his work as a spiritual guide for the last several thousand years. But what often gets overlooked is that as world creator, he’s an expert on the environment. Since he has over six billion followers (not including Instagram), I was lucky to score an interview with him when I ran into him at the W hotel.

View From Bonac: Grace Schulman’s new Book of Poems

Rainbows, beach walks, silk scarves, jazz and smoky bars are just some themes in Grace Schulman’s new book of poems “The Marble Bed.”

Climate Corner: Planet Full Of Leftovers

My favorite moment returning home to Sag Harbor after renting our house out has always been discovering Renter Food, the massive amount of stuff left behind that I’d never think to buy, but was happy to find (Cha-Ching!). This was our junk food Christmas.

Climate Corner: Does The Planet Have Your Vote This November?

In 2012, a thirsty dog named Rosie stopped to lap up a bit of water from Georgica Pond. Three hours later she was dead. A toxin called microcystin that’s commonly caused by algae blooms was found in her liver. It’s hard not to see Rosie as the canary in the coal mine. If this could happen in the pond of Steven Spielberg and Ron Perelman, it can happen anywhere.

The Climate Corner: Vineyards Explore Organic Methods

“Someday, we may not even have the wines that we now know, like Chardonnay and Burgundy,” says Larry Perrine, partner at Channing Daughters Winery in Bridgehampton. “But we’ll always have rosé, right?” I ask, trying to hide the tears in my eyes.

On The Road: Pandemic Parenting and Backyard Movies

“Curiouser and Curiouser,” said little Alice. This was back in the 19th century, and it came in response to the bizarre things she encountered as she bumbled her way through Wonderland, including stoned caterpillars and free pieces of cake. But Wonderland’s got nothing on 2020.

Letter From Home: Tapsalteerie

Self-quarantining is not a new practice for some of us. I have been in training most of my adult life. I am a writer. With agoraphobic tendencies.

Prickles, Thorns and Spines, Oh My

I don’t know why I became obsessed over clarifying the difference between things on a plant that will draw blood, but it’s a rabbit hole I fell down that I thought I’d share with you. Perhaps it’s because the word prickle makes me smile, but I thought I’d clarify the terms for us.

“Locally Sourced” at the Heckscher

The Heckscher’s wide-ranging collection includes European and American art spanning three centuries. To celebrate its centenary, the museum is focusing on works by regional artists, from Edward Moran’s atmospheric 1872 study of fog-bound sailboats in New York Bay (one of Heckscher’s original donations) to a pair of mixed-media works on paper from Bastienne Schmidt’s Underwater Topography series, completed last year. Comprising more than 100 works, “Locally Sourced: Collecting Long Island Artists,” on view through March 15, illustrates the diversity of the region’s creative community, with something to please everyone’s taste, including the children’s.

Home: Never Wanting to Leave Sag Harbor

I often wonder why it is that I’m forever teeter-tottering between wanting to travel the world and never wanting to leave home? My husband, man of few words, reminds me that it is because our ‘home’, Sag Harbor, is one of the most beautiful places in the world. One minute I’m at the top-ready to fly off to foreign lands; while the next minute, I don’t want to budge from under my electric throw blanket. However, after speaking with the Schiavonis, I realize I’m not the only one that feels that way.

Looking Back: Puritans On Long Island

By Jim Marquardt The Duke of York wrote to Governor Andrus, a colonial administrator in New Amsterdam, on April 8, 1675, “I shall let you...

Notes From the Field: Cutting Stems In the Winter

It’s that time of year, when the air starts to taste different, when you can see the far side of winter and off in the distance — yes for sure, that’s definitely spring. Still, don’t be fooled into letting down your guard, we could possibly still have a lot of cold to get through but on sunny days. I too want to go out there and do some gardening, and yes, I too am sick of weeding (although I did get a nifty new longer handled Japanese weeding hoe that I’m very excited about. I still can’t kneel or squat down without pain in my new knee). So, what to do?

Notes From the Field: Slow Down, Amateur Gardeners!

I recently attended an event where we were instructed to close our eyes and envision our ideal 2040 and then report to the room what changes in our lives we could make to head towards that future. Not surprisingly, a great many individuals declared their first step would be to grow their own food. Everyone said ‘Bravo”, but inside I shuddered a little. I’ve watched many folks set out on this same path, get totally overwhelmed, and not only fail and feel miserable, but also develop a real aversion to gardening.

Everything “Old” Really is New Again

I’ve reached an age when my grandmother, at the same age I am now, was an old woman. She wore black orthopedic shoes, a corset, and had tight blue curls for hair. She’d had an interesting life traveling the world when she was first married. She’d been one of the first women ever to attend Stanford University. But in her 70s she seemed Past Prime Time.

Latest Articles

A Welcome Return For Sag Harbor’s HarborFest

HarborFest returned to Sag Harbor this weekend after a one-year hiatus owing to the coronavirus, and to say it was a hit with a population that has grown weary of being cooped up would be an understatement. Huge crowds converged on Long Wharf and the waterfront under sunny blue skies to listen to music, sample food from a number of purveyors, browse displays or watch the whaleboat races.

Dead Air Surrounds WLNG Tower Application

Over a year ago, when COVID-19 led to an influx of full-time residents in Sag Harbor, village officials scrambled to improve cellular service, which by all accounts suffered considerably as more people competed for limited bandwidth.

Sag Harbor Names New Clerk-Administrator

The reshuffling continues in the Sag Harbor Municipal Building, where on Tuesday, the Village Board named Kate Locascio, who has served as the village tax clerk, to replace Beth Kamper as village clerk-administrator. Ms. Kamper will retire on Thursday, September 23.