Home Opinion

Opinion

Editorial: Second-Guessing Steinbeck Park

“Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen,” said celebrated author John Steinbeck — and it appears that the committee advising Sag Harbor Village on the future of its newest waterfront park have more than a few ideas in mind regarding the name of that space. 

Prickles, Thorns and Spines, Oh My

I don’t know why I became obsessed over clarifying the difference between things on a plant that will draw blood, but it’s a rabbit hole I fell down that I thought I’d share with you. Perhaps it’s because the word prickle makes me smile, but I thought I’d clarify the terms for us.

“Locally Sourced” at the Heckscher

The Heckscher’s wide-ranging collection includes European and American art spanning three centuries. To celebrate its centenary, the museum is focusing on works by regional artists, from Edward Moran’s atmospheric 1872 study of fog-bound sailboats in New York Bay (one of Heckscher’s original donations) to a pair of mixed-media works on paper from Bastienne Schmidt’s Underwater Topography series, completed last year. Comprising more than 100 works, “Locally Sourced: Collecting Long Island Artists,” on view through March 15, illustrates the diversity of the region’s creative community, with something to please everyone’s taste, including the children’s.

Editorial: Who We Are

The Reverend Karen Campbell of Christ Episcopal Church in Sag Harbor is the latest East End resident to return from the southern border with eyewitness testimony of what’s happening there, despite the politically charged rhetoric that has made conversations about immigration so difficult. But they are necessary conversations — and perhaps they are most effective when led by ministers, who can remind everyone of the moral imperatives that often get overshadowed. 

Letters to the Editor: February 27, 2020

Fond Memories I really enjoyed Jim Marquardt’s article on the Watchcase factory saving Sag Harbor . The history of Fahys and Bulova were very informative....

Editorial: An American Success Story

As Black History Month comes to a close, February delivered a devastating blow with the death of B. Smith, whose pioneering role as an African American entrepreneur cannot be overstated. 

Home: Never Wanting to Leave Sag Harbor

I often wonder why it is that I’m forever teeter-tottering between wanting to travel the world and never wanting to leave home? My husband, man of few words, reminds me that it is because our ‘home’, Sag Harbor, is one of the most beautiful places in the world. One minute I’m at the top-ready to fly off to foreign lands; while the next minute, I don’t want to budge from under my electric throw blanket. However, after speaking with the Schiavonis, I realize I’m not the only one that feels that way.

Looking Back: Puritans On Long Island

By Jim Marquardt The Duke of York wrote to Governor Andrus, a colonial administrator in New Amsterdam, on April 8, 1675, “I shall let you...

Notes From the Field: Cutting Stems In the Winter

It’s that time of year, when the air starts to taste different, when you can see the far side of winter and off in the distance — yes for sure, that’s definitely spring. Still, don’t be fooled into letting down your guard, we could possibly still have a lot of cold to get through but on sunny days. I too want to go out there and do some gardening, and yes, I too am sick of weeding (although I did get a nifty new longer handled Japanese weeding hoe that I’m very excited about. I still can’t kneel or squat down without pain in my new knee). So, what to do?

Editorial: A Teachable Moment

Race remains a third rail topic in America, and Black History Month in February presents an opportunity to stride forward purposefully, or to misstep. Sometimes...

Letters to the Editor: January 6, 2020

The Real Enemy I write to you today as a private citizen, not representing any of the organizations with which I work professionally or personally. The...

Editorial: The Start of Something

Last week’s Press Sessions discussion focusing on the East Hampton Airport and its future was a start of a conversation that needs to dig much, much deeper. The fact that the debate wasn’t altogether acrimonious was a good start. The fact that it was a rare face-to-face exchange of information from two deeply entrenched sides is, frankly, troubling, since that’s the only way a real solution will be found.

Editorial: Slow Down, You Move Too Fast

It was a quick shift — the moment when smartphones went from a device most commonly found in the hands of working adults, to one that some children expect to receive while still in elementary school.

Notes From the Field: Slow Down, Amateur Gardeners!

I recently attended an event where we were instructed to close our eyes and envision our ideal 2040 and then report to the room what changes in our lives we could make to head towards that future. Not surprisingly, a great many individuals declared their first step would be to grow their own food. Everyone said ‘Bravo”, but inside I shuddered a little. I’ve watched many folks set out on this same path, get totally overwhelmed, and not only fail and feel miserable, but also develop a real aversion to gardening.

Letters to the Editor: January 30, 2020

Spirit Is Alive On January 24, the Sag Harbor Booster Foundation hosted the ninth annual Spirit Night. It is an evening designed to showcase and...

Latest Articles

Philanthropists and Artists Create Grant For Struggling Performers, Artists and Art Educators

With professionals in all sorts of arts fields currently suffering from lack of work on the East End, Andrea Grover and other members of the Hamptons Arts Network decided to create a grant program for struggling artists. Then artists Eric Fischl and Clifford Ross jumped into the effort and ran with it.

Welcome to the Green Room: Director Marcia Milgrom Dodge Looks Back at her Bay...

There’s nothing like forced downtime to inspire a busy person to focus on organizational tasks, and in recent months, director Marcia Milgrom Dodge has been spending her days at home, rifling through old boxes in the small Manhattan apartment she shares with her husband, Anthony Dodge. And in those boxes, Dodge has discovered forgotten gold — buried treasure in the form of scripts, photographs, playbills and opening night congratulatory messages from the plays Dodge directed and choreographed for Bay Street Theater between 1999 and 2013.

Shelter Island Artist and Ferry Captain is Charting the Course for her Future

Carefully sketching in her studio space, 28-year-old Jodi Bentivegna let her long brown hair fall to the side as she nudged her glasses to look up and greet Southampton Arts Center (SAC) patrons. This was way back on February 9, and the young artist was excited to debut her work at one of the largest art museum’s on the East End.