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Climate Corner: Get Your Next Car in Green

My 2010 Toyota Corolla is what people politely call a beach car, and impolitely call a piece of … well … they’re just being honest. The exterior is covered in nicks and scrapes. Inside, it looks like I’m always on my way to the dump. It’s the sort of car that you never have to lock, because if someone is desperate enough to steal it, be my guest.

Climate Corner: A Q&A with a Higher Authority

Most people know God for his work as a spiritual guide for the last several thousand years. But what often gets overlooked is that as world creator, he’s an expert on the environment. Since he has over six billion followers (not including Instagram), I was lucky to score an interview with him when I ran into him at the W hotel.

View From Bonac: Grace Schulman’s new Book of Poems

Rainbows, beach walks, silk scarves, jazz and smoky bars are just some themes in Grace Schulman’s new book of poems “The Marble Bed.”

Climate Corner: Planet Full Of Leftovers

My favorite moment returning home to Sag Harbor after renting our house out has always been discovering Renter Food, the massive amount of stuff left behind that I’d never think to buy, but was happy to find (Cha-Ching!). This was our junk food Christmas.

Editorial: For State Assembly

In truth, there is nothing to grapple with here: Regardless of where a voter falls on the political spectrum, a vote for Fred W. Thiele Jr. is the only sensible one.

Editorial: The Propositions

There are two questions on the November 3 ballot from Suffolk County. Our position is that “no” is the proper way to mark the ballot in both instances.

Editorial: For Congress

Nancy Goroff is our enthusiastic choice for the 1st District seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Editorial: For State Senate

For the first time since 1977, the 1st District will not be represented in the State Senate by Kenneth LaValle, who is retiring after a legendary career.

Climate Corner: Does The Planet Have Your Vote This November?

In 2012, a thirsty dog named Rosie stopped to lap up a bit of water from Georgica Pond. Three hours later she was dead. A toxin called microcystin that’s commonly caused by algae blooms was found in her liver. It’s hard not to see Rosie as the canary in the coal mine. If this could happen in the pond of Steven Spielberg and Ron Perelman, it can happen anywhere.

The Climate Corner: Vineyards Explore Organic Methods

“Someday, we may not even have the wines that we now know, like Chardonnay and Burgundy,” says Larry Perrine, partner at Channing Daughters Winery in Bridgehampton. “But we’ll always have rosé, right?” I ask, trying to hide the tears in my eyes.

Letters to the Editor: 9/10/20

Letters to the Editor: 9/10/20

EDITORIAL: For North Haven Village

That, in itself, is a reason to endorse Terie Diat over Mr. Fiore. One party governance, even in a small village like North Haven, should in most cases be avoided, particularly when all candidates involved have so much to offer. Ms. Diat would be an impressive newcomer who just might start to open up the elective process in North Haven in a healthful way.

Letters to the Editor: 7/30/20

Letters to the Editor for the week of July 30, 2020.

Editorial: Make It Work

It’s a scary time. It’s even scarier for members of the workforce — currently employed or not.

Letters to the Editor: 7/23/20

Letters to the Editor for the week of July 23, 2020.

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