Fine Arts

John Stango Brings Americana Pop Art to Bridgehampton

Art is in John Stango’s blood. The Philadelphia-based pop-art painter is the son of a talented artist, and the cousin of an American illustrating icon. Mr. Stango’s artistic talents were cultivated and encouraged early on by his mother, Frances Elaine Rockwell, who was also a painter and lover of the arts. Mr. Stango didn’t discover until later on that that there was to be another major artistic influence in his life, his mother’s relative, Norman Rockwell.

LongHouse Reserve Celebrates Young Artists at Student Annual VIII

On Wednesday, June 17, the LongHouse Reserve in East Hampton hosted the Student Annual VIII honoring artwork inspired by the reserve, which students in...

Tripoli Gallery in East Hampton Opens “A Walk … Curated by Rob Teeters”

On Saturday, June 27 from 7 to 9 p.m., the Tripoli Gallery in East Hampton will host a reception for “A Walk … Curated...

Richard J. Demato Gallery Shows a Little Skin

It’s not just beachgoers who dare to go bare this summer in Sag Harbor. RJD Gallery on Main Street is taking it all off with “Skin Deep.”

A Whale of a Show Brings Salt Air to the Sag Harbor Whaling &...

Dan Rizzie, an artist for more than 40 years, is best known for his colorful bird imagery. But whales have actually been on his mind for years. He was certainly thinking about them when he and gallery owner Peter Marcelle hatched up an idea to raise money for the Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum approximately four years ago. That’s when they conceptualized the idea, and the name, of the Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum’s first “Whale of a Show” art benefit exhibit and sale, which debuted in 2013.

Romany Kramoris in Sag Harbor Shows Schlesinger, Maxwell Smith & Jackson

The Romany Kramoris Gallery will open the holiday weekend with a locals show, featuring Christina Schlesinger, Dinah Maxwell Smith, and Ruby Jackson. The show...

Small Scale in a Big Show at Silas Marder Gallery in Bridgehampton

With more than 50 artists and 150 pieces represented, the annual “Big Show” at Silas Marder Gallery in Bridgehampton is a monumental undertaking. Having that many items to hang can be overwhelming, though fortunately the art is relatively easy to handle since it’s all created in an 8-inch-by-11-inch format, says exhibition organizer Jess Frost. But just because the canvases and panels are small, doesn’t mean that the statements made on them aren’t big, she adds.

An Evening with Dan Rizzie at Peter Marcelle Gallery

In celebration of Sag Harbor artist Dan Rizzie’s new book, recently published by the University of Texas Press, and an accompanying exhibit, the Peter...

“Chuck Close Photographs” Opens at The Parrish

Chuck Close (American, born 1940) Self-Portrait/ Composite/ Nine Parts, 1979. Nine color Polaroid mounted on canvas. 82 x 68 inches. Whitney Museum of American...

Art With Animal Attraction

Maybe it’s an inherent part of our human nature, but it seems very few people can resist images of very cute animals — or any animal for that reason. And this Saturday, art goers and animal lovers alike will have the opportunity to get an eyeful when the Richard J. Demato Art Gallery in Sag Harbor opens “A Magical Menagerie,” an exhibit of 30-plus paintings and mixed media works all depicting animals.

Members Exhibition Brings Art & Community Together at Guild Hall

Even for professional artists, the dream of showing in a museum is rarely realized. But for East End locals, the opportunity is within reach. All it takes is a piece of artwork, residency and a membership to Guild Hall in East Hampton. That’s because the annual “Artists Members Exhibition,” the oldest non-juried museum exhibition on Long Island, is also one of the few non-juried museum shows that is still offered. Better yet, the giant group exhibition at Guild Hall, which features the work of hundreds of East Enders every year, offers a grand prize of a solo show at the museum to the winner. This one-man or one-woman exhibition is offered regardless of whether the Top Honor recipient is a pro or amateur.

“For Lisa” Opens at the Tripoli Gallery

The Tripoli Gallery East Hampton will debut a solo exhibition by Puerto Rican artist Félix Bonilla Gerena, “For Lisa,” for the official launch of...

Local Artists Embrace the Audacity of Abstraction

Independent of representational imagery, abstract art is a bold departure from its figurative and scenic brethren. Not surprisingly, given the bohemian allure of the Hamptons in the mid-century years, the East End has long been associated with the boundary-pushing genre. From the beginning of the movement—which saw the birth of colorful works of Mark Rothko to the expressive drip paintings of Jackson Pollock and biomorphic geometry of Willem de Kooning—to the artists who are producing today—including Dan Welden, Roy Nicholson, Gerson Leiber, Shari Abramson and Dennis Leri—it’s easy to see that when it comes to genres of art, there is perhaps none more audacious than that of the abstract ilk.

A Life Less Ordinary with David Slater at the Peter Marcelle Project

It’s been 60 years since David Slater first picked up a paintbrush. In that time, the Sag Harbor-based artist has lived a storied life, full of unusual experiences. He has travelled the country, frequently by thumb and boxcar. He’s met a coterie of unusual characters. He’s taught art, both here in the States and abroad. And he’s done his fair share of hard labor as well.

Latest Articles

Q&A With Bay Street’s Artistic Director Scott Schwartz

This week, Bay Street Theater unveiled its plans for a new facility to be built on Long Island Avenue in Sag Harbor. Bay Street Artistic Director Scott Schwartz talked about the way in which a new space will change what the theater can offer.

Friends Of Bay Street Target 2 Main Street Property To Add To Steinbeck Park

On Tuesday, during a Zoom meeting to unveil the initial renderings for the new theater, Adam Potter, the chairman of Friends of Bay Street, announced that his not-for-profit organization is also in discussions to purchase 2 Main Street, which is currently home to K Pasa restaurant, Espresso, the Yummylicious ice cream parlor, and Havens, a gift shop.

‘Dust For Blood’ Reveals Truth of Long Island’s Migrant Labor Camps

In 1949, two young children died in a Bridgehampton migrant camp while their parents were out working in the fields. The children, who were alone at the time, were killed when the 12-foot-by-20-foot chicken coop in which the family lived caught fire. The tragedy was hardly the first and it would definitely not be the last of many that befell the East End’s migrant farm population in the mid-20th century.