Film

Reeling in Retro

 “I’ve always been a fan of the dri-ve-in,” admits Sag Harbor’s Debbie Skinner. “I grew up by the Whitestone Bridge in Queens — in...

Films With Green Theme Underscore College’s Mission

By Marianna Levine With movies ranging in subject from butterflies and turtles to building in an eco-friendly way, Stony Brook Southampton’s First Annual Green Film...

Black Film Festival Comes to Town

This weekend, a new film festival comes to the Sag Harbor Cinema on Main Street. Granted, by festival standards it’ll be a pretty modest...

Gray, Gay and Late for a Date: Film Looks at those who come out...

Ken was 72 years old at the time. Elaine was 79. For LeAnna the change came at 60. In their previous lives these were people...

Filmmakers’ Second Act: Festival for movies overlooked the first time around

  From Sundance, Cannes and Telluride to nearly every other big (and small) city in the world, for movie lovers there is never a shortage...

Propose Permits for Filmmakers

In recent weeks, residents may have noticed a film crew working in the vicinity of Long Beach. With an eye toward perhaps more filmmakers...

Film Hopes to Raise Awareness of Helicopter Noise

As the Memorial Day weekend — the unofficial start of the summer season — bears down on local residents, the fear of helicopters and low...

Latest Articles

Q&A With Bay Street’s Artistic Director Scott Schwartz

This week, Bay Street Theater unveiled its plans for a new facility to be built on Long Island Avenue in Sag Harbor. Bay Street Artistic Director Scott Schwartz talked about the way in which a new space will change what the theater can offer.

Friends Of Bay Street Target 2 Main Street Property To Add To Steinbeck Park

On Tuesday, during a Zoom meeting to unveil the initial renderings for the new theater, Adam Potter, the chairman of Friends of Bay Street, announced that his not-for-profit organization is also in discussions to purchase 2 Main Street, which is currently home to K Pasa restaurant, Espresso, the Yummylicious ice cream parlor, and Havens, a gift shop.

‘Dust For Blood’ Reveals Truth of Long Island’s Migrant Labor Camps

In 1949, two young children died in a Bridgehampton migrant camp while their parents were out working in the fields. The children, who were alone at the time, were killed when the 12-foot-by-20-foot chicken coop in which the family lived caught fire. The tragedy was hardly the first and it would definitely not be the last of many that befell the East End’s migrant farm population in the mid-20th century.