Business: Saunders Welcomes Bronstein, St. Pat’s in Full Swing

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Janis Bronstein

Saunders & Associates Welcomes Janis Bronstein

With 23 years of real estate experience, Janis Bronstein has a passion for business — having financed thousands of properties during her years at Manhattan Mortgage and, now, through her work at Saunders & Associates.

“Her intimate knowledge of both residential and commercial real estate from the practical, emotional and financial sides can help you with your real estate decisions,” according to a press release. “Janis has bought, sold and built homes, and knows how it feels to be a builder, seller and buyer of properties, and what makes sense.”

An East End resident since 1993, Bronstein now lives with her daughter in Sag Harbor, where they enjoy what every season has to offer.

“Janis can bring all of her value-added expertise to you, in your search to locate the perfect property for your needs, or to sell or rent your current home,” the release said. “Let her real estate savvy and understanding of how to make the process work on all levels assist you in buying or selling your Hamptons property.”

For more information, email jbronstein@saunders.com.

For the Love of the Irish: St. Patrick’s Fare in Full Swing

For St. Paddy’s foodies across the East End, the wait is officially over.

Grab a plate of corned beef and cabbage — paired with red potatoes, carrots, Irish soda bread, butter, coffee and tea — during a St. Patrick’s Day dinner, hosted by the Sag Harbor Lions Club, on Thursday, March 14, at the Old Whalers Church, located at 44 Union Street in Sag Harbor.

Job Potter and Friends will perform traditional Irish music and contemporary songs, and a vegetarian option will also be served.

Each dinner will cost $25, or $15 for children under age 12. The net profit will benefit the Sag Harbor Food Pantry, Lions Long Island Eye Bank, East End Hospice, SHLC Scholarships, and other causes. For more information, visit sagharborlionsclub.org.

For a more formal dining experience — without the added cost — The 1770 House and chef Michael Rozzi will serve $17.70 Corned Beef & Cabbage in the main dining room and downstairs tavern, located at 143 Main Street in East Hampton.

“The premier year-round destination for authentic Hamptons fine dining and luxury accommodations is an 18th-century colonial home on stately Main Street in East Hampton’s historic district,” according to a press release. “Under one roof, a dual dining concept reflects both sides of the lively Hamptons restaurant scene with local bounty, noteworthy wines, five-star service and celebrity sightings that has been honored as an Open Table Top 100 USA restaurant.”

For more information, visit 1770house.com.

Photo: Outdoor vender (Credit: Bob Beck)

New Carriage House Thrift Shop To Open in Southampton

The newly restored carriage house, on the grounds of the 1-acre Rogers Mansion Museum complex, is open for business — almost.

Now home to the Carriage House Thrift Shop, the store will welcome business most Fridays and Saturdays between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., but from Saturday, June 15, through Saturday, October 12.

“The Shop will be offering a wide variety of donated goods and consignment items,” a press release said. “They include hand-made jewelry, home furnishings, vintage clothing, ceramics and vintage objects from all periods.”

A Summer Outdoor Fair, featuring selected artisan and antique venders, will be held on the grounds from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. throughout the summer, including Saturdays, June 15, July 6 and 20, August 3 and 24, September 14 and 28, and October 12.

For more information, call (631) 283-2494 or visit southamptonhistory.org.

Lobster: The New Chicken in the Pot Pie

Don’t judge a pot pie by its cover.

Falling in and out of fancy since the days of the Roman Empire — when living birds would sometimes burst out from under the shell when served — pot pies eventually crossed the Atlantic, making an appearance in the circa-1796 cookbook “American Cookery.”

It included a chicken pot pie, a beef pot pie, and something called a “Sea Pie,” which listed pigeon, turkey, veal and mutton in the ingredients.

Two centuries later, a new chapter in the pot pie legacy is being penned by chef Jay Lippin of Baron’s Cove — whose menu is reflects the fresh coastal tradition of Sag Harbor and focuses on sustainability and interpretations of classic Long Island dishes.

Hence, a re-imagined lobster pot pie.

“Why use chicken when you can use the pure white meat of lobster and regional fare?” Lippin said. “Lobster is so Native American — so early settlers — and definitely a New England delicacy. Accent it with some bacon and morels, and the taste is sublime.”

For more information, visit baronscove.com.

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