Bits: Zisser Makes a Splash, Artists-in-Residence at Guild Hall, Bay Street Gears Up for Main Stage

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Curves in 6 Colors by Mike Zisser.

Artist Mike Zisser Makes a Splash with Color

Mike Zisser concerns himself mostly with color, painting mainly in acrylics and, occasionally, watercolors.

He is fascinated by the role it plays in the dynamics of composition and its effect on the visual perceptions of the observer — his later paintings virtually all non-representational, reflecting his interest in abstract design elements and geometric shapes, all visually “complicated” by pairings of colors.

A selection will be on view on Saturday, February 16, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Griffing & Collins Real Estate and DJTM Enterprises, LLC office, located at 2 Grand Avenue in Shelter Island Heights. Champagne, wine and small bites will be served.

For more information, visit mikezisser.com.

Guild Hall Names 2019 Artists-In-Residence

In 2016, Guild Hall founded its Guild House Artist-in-Residence Program, as a means to extend the East Hampton museum’s mission of fostering the artistic spirit of the East End.

But this is not a studio-based residency. Instead, Guild House AIR supports the next generation of artists by providing the time and space for reflection and development of supportive and collaborative relationships — not to mention a four-week living space and stipend.

This year, eight residents — split between two AIR periods — will focus on the physical structure of Guild House as a place for temporary exhibition, installation, performance and creative intervention, encouraged to work solo or together on stage environments, readings, or performances, and to further seek imaginative uses of the house in meaningful but impermanent ways.

“Guild House is not a studio-based program, but rather provides the time and space for reflection and the development of supportive and collaborative relationships,” according to a press release. “The program will continue to host the lively weekly Salon Dinners that provide an opportunity for the residents to meet artists and community members to discuss an array of topicals.”

For the spring session, held from April 15 to May 13, residents will include Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist Tess Howsam — who curates and directs ekphrastic shows that blend theater, installation art and performance, and seeks to subvert theatrical expectations and build cross-disciplinary collaborations that address contemporary sociological, political and environmental issues — and Bronx-based photographer Matthew Jensen, a 2017 GIDEST Fellow and 2016 Guggenheim Fellow.

Turkish writer and filmmaker Burcu Koray, who works with natural landscapes, human bodies and mythologies, has installed her site-specific pieces inside an arboretum, an airport, an Arctic church and a fishing vessel touring the Black Sea, and at Guild Hall, she will work on “Songs from the Word Shed,” a novel that tackles the mystery of speech, and “Fluid City,” a series of video-based works featuring AR & VR180.

Rounding out the spring group is New Jersey-based visual artist and writer André Terrel Jackson, who uses language to center the voices and images of blackness. Through mining personal history, he incorporates poetry, weaving, sculpture and apparel to investigate intersecting identities.

Come fall, Guild Hall will welcome four new residents from October 28 to November 25.

Poet Caitlin Doyle holds an Elliston Fellowship in Poetry at the University of Cincinnati, where she serves as Associate Editor of The Cincinnati Review. Her poems, essays and reviews have appeared in The Atlantic, The Guardian and The Yale Review, among others, and she is working toward the completion of her debut poetry collection.

Multidisciplinary artist Luisa Caldwell’s style ranges from intimate works on paper to large-scale installations in the public realm. Based in Brooklyn, her use of reclaimed and collected materials sits at the core of her installations, while drawing is the prevailing process in her small works. Color, nature, pattern and decoration are all important and continuing aspects found in her many bodies of work.

Brazilian-born Laura Belém works in a range of mediums, including installation, sculpture, photography, video and collage, and has exhibited her work in Brazil and abroad since the early 2000s, while Manhattan-based playwright Dipti Bramhandkar began writing during her childhood as an act of survival when she moved from Mumbai to upstate New York. Her work grapples with immigration, identity, diaspora and coming-of-age.

For more information, visit guildhall.org.

Calling All Actors: Bay Street Gears Up for Mainstage Season

The 2019 Mainstage Season is officially upon Bay Street Theater, which will hold LORT Non-Rep, LORT C and Equity Principal auditions on February 16, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Sag Harbor theater, located at 1 Bay Street.

To audition for Artistic Director Scott Schwartz and Associate Producer John Sullivan, bring a photo and resume, and prepare a contemporary monologue no longer than two minutes. For those who wish to demonstrate a singing skill, prepare a one-minute monologue and 16 bars of a song — not to exceed two minutes total.

During the Mainstage season, Jack O’Brien will direct “Safe Space” by Alan Fox, with contract dates from May 2 to June 16. Roles include Judith Rose, the 60-year-old Jewish president of Alman College; Marcus Wood, a 35-year-old African-American adjunct professor; and Jenny Oshiro, a 20-year-old Japanese-American sophomore.

An untitled world premiere play by Wade Dooley, directed by Scott Schwartz, will have contract dates from May 30 to July 21. Roles have been cast for Irene, an actress, age 80, and Wade, 20s to 30s, the actress’s line prompter, but future replacements and an understudy for Irene are wanted.

Sarna Lapine will direct “Annie Get Your Gun” — with book by Herbert and Dorothy Fields, and music and lyrics by Irving Berlin — with contract dates from July 4 to August 25.

Good comedic timing, a strong presence and zero inhibitions are required to portray Annie Oakley, a famous sharpshooter and strong belter with a significant range — a young backwoods character with self-assurance and spunk, who transforms from dirty illiterate to the star of the “Buffalo Bill Show” by virtue of her expert marksmanship and sunny disposition.

Available roles also include leading man Frank Butler, the male star of the “Buffalo Bill Show,” who is a lyric baritone suited for a strong, self-assured actor, bordering on conceited with a strong command. Dolly Tate is his assistant — a good alto, with an obnoxious personality, who must be able to play “big character” without being “over the top.”

Charlie Davenport, Dolly’s brother and chief critic, is a seen-it-all roadie who is a capable baritone, sarcastic, direct, and exasperated with the craziness of the tour. Winnie Tate, Dolly’s pretty younger sister, is a dancer and light belter, while her husband, Tommy Keeler, is a dancer and a light baritone/tenor.

Buffalo Bill Cody, owner and emcee for the Buffalo Bill show, is a good baritone with a showman personality. Chief Sitting Bull is a non-singing baritone role and dryly hilarious. Crusty old hotel manager Foster Wilson, also a non-singing role, is a baritone with a strong personality and dry wit.

Pawnee Bill, a somewhat oily, less respectable version of Buffalo Bill, is a baritone with good showman skills. Minnie, Jessie and Nellie are Annie Oakley’s backwoods sisters, strong singers and actresses age 7 to 15. And Little Jake is her brother, a capable singer with good comedic timing, also age 7 to 15.

For more information, visit baystreet.org.

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