Addō Sag Harbor Brings, Joins and Inspires

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Shelly Bredau at Addō in Sag Harbor. 

By Carrie Ann Salvi

The community has welcomed Addō into the unrecognizably restyled space formerly occupied by a dry cleaning business on Sag Harbor’s Main Street. The locally-owned, new boutique on the block opened its door on July 1, and its unique contents, and architecturally and esthetically pleasing upgrades, have been managed by Shelly Bredau of East Hampton. Despite its upscale appearance, Ms. Bredau said, “people make it a point to mention that they appreciate that it’s not another Tommy Hilfiger.”

There is no big box merchandise to be found in the lofty, rectangular-shaped rooms, and there are few mass produced brands offered, but there is no shortage of high quality designs for all shapes, sizes, styles, and price ranges. The focus is on the people behind the products, from emerging local or established international designers.

Go-to dresses at the boutique support the likes of Jesse Elliot of Greenport, whose beachy and relaxed Whitewash line is manufactured locally using sustainable fabrics and natural dyes. If there had to be a lifestyle associated, it would be one with an adoration of flipflops and loungewear that looks elegant but feels like pajamas. At nightfall, many of the looks can be stepped up with a wedge and unique accessories.

“Thought went into this,” said Ms. Bredau. She raised her children in East Hampton, and back then, she said “there were many mom-and-pop shops,” now there is little she can find there for her family.  “I lost my town overnight, it is criminal,” she said.

The store is named with an Italian word that means “to give, bring, place, inspire, cause, add, or join” and it offers small batch clothing, accessories, and culinary selections. Much of what is found, cannot be elsewhere, such as an exclusive eyewear collection created by a Columbia MBA graduate from Korea, Spinoza sunglasses, whose funky designs are made from top notch technology with durable lightweight materials used for smart phone cases.

As a lifestyle concept store in Sag Harbor they had to carry sunglasses, Ms. Bredau said, but rather than Ray Bans, she chose a better-than-brand-name line found nowhere else in the United States. She loves, as do the customers, the stories behind who actually make the products. She also welcomes their designers to hang out in-house to represent their lines.

Jane August, a popular handbag designer, was on hand to chat about her Italian made treasures. Photo by Carrie Ann Salvi

Jane August, a popular handbag designer, was on hand to chat about her Italian made treasures. Photo by Carrie Ann Salvi

“Jane’s bags fit,” said Ms. Bredau as example, speaking of Jane August, a luxury handbag designer who was on site last Monday to present her collection. “They are all hand made in Italy, a third generation family. I know everyone at the sewing machines, and at lunchtime the grandmother makes pasta,” she explained.

“Not everyone wants to buy python,” Ms. August said, so she brings a range of styles for a diverse demographic. It is “not about the icons” for her bags, she said, “I don’t knock anybody off, that is not interesting to me.”

“Fringe is in, people know what is happening,” Ms. August said of her recent best sellers. Some bags have python zipper pulls and an option for an additional chain for those who wish to transition it into evening bag, or for daytime comfort over the shoulder.

Hilary Leff's scarves are made with dyes grown in her garden in East Hampton.

Hilary Leff’s scarves are made with dyes grown in her garden in East Hampton.

And then there is Hilary Leff, who grows hollyhocks and marigolds in her East Hampton garden, or walnuts at Amber Waves, to dye her Indigo Jane cotton, silk, linen, and cashmere scarves. Ms. Leff traveled through India where she became fascinated with natural dying process, and then started Indigo Jane Textiles. “Her hands are literally blue,” Ms. Bredau said, but the dyes are friendly to humans and their environment.

A large portion of the back wall is filled with Farm Candy, culinary creations by Pamela Stone, of New York and Sagaponack.

Farm Candy of Sagaponack has shelves of unique creations, including unique blends of spices, olive oils and chocolate. Photo by Carrie Ann Salvi

Farm Candy of Sagaponack has shelves of unique creations, including unique blends of spices, olive oils and chocolate. Photo by Carrie Ann Salvi

Her source is primarily local farms, except for her artesian olive oils and vinegars, which are cold-pressed infused with cilantro or orange peel, for example. Fresh and organic flavor profiles include her strawberry sriracha sea salt, and all are packaged perfectly for home display or gift giving.

A resident of Sag Harbor for about 20 years, Stella Flame is now designing and offering her renowned jewelry in the village building, with the help of a master jeweler in Instanbul.

Another Sag Harbor resident came aboard after she walked through the doors in a fabulous jumper that Ms. Bredau admired. As it turned out, her company, Line Dry, manufactured it with the help of pattern cutters in New York City.

“Jes Wade is our highest end,” said Ms. Bredau. She uses heritage fabrics from France and Italy to create one-of-a-kind, hand sewn and beaded dresses for the special occasion, or for frankly, those that can afford it.

“We do have those people, and those fancier events in Sag Harbor,” she said, “I’d rather support this woman instead of Alexander McQueen.”

She also admitted to hiding one in the back for a special occasion of her own.

Addo is located at 7 Main Street in Sag Harbor and at addosagharbor.com. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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